Recruitment in 2018 – the checklist for New Zealand businesses

The New Year is here and with that brings times of change for firms across New Zealand.

Employees may be moving on to pastures new, others transitioning into new roles, existing teams reshuffled for finished projects, and new teams needed for upcoming developments.

To ensure the best efficiency for your business and those involved, here are 10 important steps to remember when recruiting in 2018.

1. ESTABLISH WHAT YOUR BUSINESS NEEDS

Having a business plan is integral to developing your business, both internally and externally. Once you have plan in place, you can establish what roles are needed to accomplish your goals. Consider: why is the role needed, what is the role, when is it needed and how long for (temporary / permanent / contract depending on short/long-term goals).

2. DEVELOP A JOB BRIEF

Now you have established your needs, the next step is to create a job description and a person specification. A job description outlines the responsibilities of the role, while a person specification outlines the qualifications, skills and attributes necessary to undertake the role. Candidates applying for a vacancy will typically ask for a position description so be prepared and have one readily available.

3. ESTABLISH A SELECTION CRITERIA AND INTERVIEW PANEL

Knowing what you’re looking for in a candidate is key to establishing a selection criteria to ensure that opportunities are not missed later down the line. Refer to both your job description and person specification to develop your selection criteria. This helps you apply an objective process when comparing candidates rather than making a subjective decision.

Remember, you are about to make a significant investment (salary, training, etc) so you need to be confident that the decision you make is sound. Ensure that your interview panel are also aware of the criteria to avoid any confusion during the interview stages.

4. ADVERTISE POSITION / TARGET INACTIVE SEEKERS / COLLECT CANDIDATES

Effective advertising is crucial if you want your position to reach the relevant audience. Firstly, consider the geographical search – is it required on a national or local level. Secondly, consider the type of industry and the best way to reach them – is it through social media, print, job sites, or maybe approaching inactive seekers.

Pool your candidates into a database for a quick and efficient search.

5. CANDIDATE SCREENING

You wouldn’t board a flight without going through security screening and the same applies to your business. Review candidate resumes and cover letters before conducting a video or phone interview to get to know your candidate better and allow them to ask any questions they may have.

6. SHORTLIST CANDIDATES

Shortlisting candidates can be both time-consuming and challenging, especially if you have a large talent pool. Our top tip: always refer back to your selection criteria and person specification, stay focussed and remember to shortlist objectively. Remember, there’s only one position so effective shortlisting is key to avoid wasting time down the line.

7. FORMAL INTERVIEWS

Armed with a strong shortlist, it’s time to whittle it down for formal interviews. Create a key list of questions that you want to ask and get to know your candidate on a personal level as well as a professional one; after all, they will be working closely with you and your team. Create a mixture of both skill and scenario questions relevant to the position.

8. BACKGROUND CHECKS AND PSYCHOMETRIC ASSESSMENTS

Background checks affirm a candidate’s skills for the role. These can include talking to a candidate’s referees and confirming their educational qualifications with relevant universities / colleges. Asking candidates to complete a psychometric assessment will also tell you a lot about how a person operates and responds to situations, and what their strengths and weaknesses are.

9. FURTHER INTERVIEWS

If it’s a close call between two or three candidates, invite them back for a final interview. These should be more informal and provide an opportunity for both you and the candidate to get to know one another. Consider taking them on a tour of the workplace to give them the opportunity to meet some of the team.

10. OFFER OF EMPLOYMENT AND EMPLOYMENT CONTRACT

Hooray – you are ready to hire! Arrange a convenient time to call the candidate and let them know that they have been successful before sending an official offer of employment. This should also be sent with legal employment contracts, to be signed by both parties. Remember, for the 90-day trial period to apply the employment contract must be signed before the individual starts work, not on the day they start.

Last but not least, take the time and a diplomatic approach to informing those candidates who were unsuccessful – opportunities may arise in the future.

EQ CONSULTANTS' EXECUTIVE RECRUITMENT SERVICES

We work in collaboration with clients to identify talent locally and globally, and then assess their suitability to deliver results. We work across all major industries to find and place the transcendent talent that will provide value for your organisation.

If you’re in need of a tailored Executive Recruitment solution for your business, please call (03) 366 4034 or email info@eqconsultants.co.nz for more information.

For more information about our Executive Recruitment, please visit www.eqconsultants.co.nz/recruitment/